Jan Bosch: Software Provocateur

Last week, I had the honor of presenting at and attending the talks of the Lindholmen Software Development Day. The first keynote speaker was Professor Jan Bosch from Chalmers, who did his best to provoke, prod, and shock the audience into action to change how they do software. While I might not agree with everything he said, overall it was very enjoyable and insightful talk.

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GPGPU for Instruction-Set Simulation – Maybe, Maybe not

I just read a quite interesting article by Christian Pinto et al, “GPGPU-Accelerated Parallel and Fast Simulation of Thousand-core Platforms“, published at the CCGRID 2011 conference. It discusses some work in using a GPGPU to run simulations of massively parallel computers, using the parallelism of the GPU to speed the simulation. Intriguing concept, but the execution is not without its flaws and it is unclear at least from the paper just how well this generalizes, scales, or compares to parallel simulation on a general-purpose multicore machine.

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The Adversarial Approach to Compilation

Paul Henning-Kamp has written a series of columns for the ACM Queue and Communications of the ACM. He isĀ  pointed, always controversial, and often quite funny. One recent column was called “The Most Expensive One-Byte Mistake“, which discusses the bad design decision of using null-terminated strings (with the associated buffer overrun risks that would have been easily avoided with a length+data-style string format). Well worth a read. A key part of the article is the dual observation that compilers are starting to try to solve the efficiency problems of null-terminated strings – and that such heavily optimizing compilers quite often very hard to use.

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